Closing The Gap Between Your Work And Your Taste

There is a danger that you face when you start doing work that you care about.

The danger is that when you compare your early work to the work of those you admire, you can see just how far you fall short.

Closing The Gap Between Your Work And Your Taste (1) - Ira Glass, Doug Neill, sketchnotes

Unfortunately, that gap that exists between your work and your good taste can lead you to stop creating. But it shouldn’t, because there’s a simple (but not easy) solution:

Do lots of work.

Closing The Gap Between Your Work And Your Taste (1) - Ira Glass, Doug Neill, sketchnotes

Everyone starts on the left side of this chasm. And everyone that gets across it does so in the same way: by doing lots of work.

The specific field doesn’t matter. Whether you’re a writer, a musician, a teacher, a filmmaker, a sketchnoter, or any other type of creative, just focus on regularly making the thing that one day you’d like to be great at, so that you can look back at the work that you’ve done and see that it meets the high expectations of your taste.

Closing The Gap Between Your Work And Your Taste (1) - Ira Glass, Doug Neill, sketchnotes

This idea is just one of many that Ira Glass shared in this interview series. Here are some of my sketchnotes of that interview series:

Closing The Gap Between Your Work And Your Taste (1) - Ira Glass, Doug Neill, sketchnotes

Check out the full set of sketchnotes here.

Then go get to work.

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Want To Dig Deeper?

If you’re new to the idea of sketchnoting and excited to develop more visual thinking tools, I think you’d enjoy our foundational course An Introduction To Visual Note-Taking.

If you’d like to make sketchnoted videos like the one you saw here, we’ve got a course for that too! Check out How To Make Sketchnote Videos.

And if you’re an educator interested in bringing visual note-taking into your classroom, check out Sketchnoting In The Classroom.