Curriculum Design Part 4: Iterate Over Time - Verbal To Visual Video - Doug Neill - teaching, learning, lesson

Curriculum Design Part 4: Iterate Over Time

This is the fourth episode in a four-part series on using visual thinking tools to help you design a meaningful learning experience. You can view Part 1 here, Part 2 here, and Part 3 here.

If you are designing a curriculum, chances are you’ll be implementing that curriculum more than once, so let’s take a look at how to improve upon it through each cycle that you teach it.

We’ll use a simple flow chart to describe what you can do:

Curriculum Design Part 4: Iterate Over Time - Verbal To Visual Video - Doug Neill - teaching, learning, lesson

First, make an adjustment. Pick something that didn’t go well, and use your new understanding of your students and the context to change it for the better.

Do that for each aspect of the curriculum that you’d like to improve, then teach it that new way.

Then ask yourself the question: is it better now? If so keep it, if not ditch it.

Then go through the cycle again.

If this sounds like a simple system, that’s because it is.

The difficult part is cutting yourself some slack with the things that don’t go well so that you have the energy to go through the cycle again and again.

That is now your task. Good luck.

[April 2017 Update: I’m currently building a resource kit called Sketchnoting In The Classroom for educators who want to help their students develop visual note-taking skills. If that sounds interesting, take a look!]

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Want To Dig Deeper?

If you’re new to the idea of sketchnoting and excited to develop more visual thinking tools, I think you’d enjoy our foundational course An Introduction To Visual Note-Taking.

If you’d like to make sketchnoted videos like the one you saw here, we’ve got a course for that too! Check out How To Make Sketchnote Videos.

And if you’re an educator interested in bringing visual note-taking into your classroom, check out Sketchnoting In The Classroom.