Sketchnoting What's Important VS What You Can Draw Featured - Verbal To Visual - Doug Neill - verbal anchor, visual anchor

Sketchnoting What’s Important VS What You Can Draw

I fell into a trap when I was new to sketchnoting.

At a time when my visual vocabulary was relatively small, I had the tendency to force generic or not-so-relevant images onto a set of ideas, simply because that was the only thing that I knew how to draw.

Rather than focusing on drawing everything, what might be a better approach is listening for the thing that triggers for you the broader context surrounding that individual idea.

Sometimes, the strongest anchor will be a quote or phrase.

Other times it will be a single image or a scene.

And sometimes it will be a combinations of those elements.

Look for the most powerful anchor, and remember that a strong verbal anchor is better than a weak visual one.

Sketchnoting What's Important VS What You Can Draw Full - Verbal To Visual - Doug Neill - verbal anchor, visual anchor

***

Want To Dig Deeper?

If you’re new to the idea of sketchnoting and excited to develop more visual thinking tools, I think you’d enjoy our foundational course An Introduction To Visual Note-Taking.

If you’d like to make sketchnoted videos like the one you saw here, we’ve got a course for that too! Check out How To Make Sketchnote Videos.

And if you’re an educator interested in bringing visual note-taking into your classroom, check out Sketchnoting In The Classroom.